The below map shows all the hikes I have made into the Sulcis Mountains to date. I have geotagged my photos and these can be viewed on the map by moving the mouse pointer over the camera icons (you'll need to zoom in on this map to see them all: hold Ctrl while rolling the mouse-wheel, or click the arrows next to the track list). Open map in new window . Map is not designed for viewing on a phone

The default map is OpenTopoMap as it clearly shows the topography, but many other maps can be selected using the drop-down on the top-right of the map. Other particularly useful maps are , it:IGM1:100k, OSM(TFOutdoors), and WorldAerial. Sadly google maps are no longer available.

For more information on each hike, including a slideshow, profile and to download GPX, use the links below:

 

 

Some networks may block the in frame map below. If it doesn't show, check your browser's address bar for option to override, or click here to open map in new window:

You can also download the Google Earth version here 

 

More Sulcis paths:

 

My Next Hikes:

I use Google Earth (screenshot below, click for high res-image), Wikiloc (Viewable in GE's Gallery) and Garmin BaseCamp to plan my hikes. Georeferenced image-overlays from GE can be imported into BaseCamp to provide free background mapping.

SulcisGE

 

I have the following hikes lined up for my next trips to Sardinia:

 

giweather joomla module

 

To avoid hunting season, websearch for calendario venatorio regione sardegna to get latest timetable. In 2018/19 it was between 30th September 2018 to 31 January 2019, Sundays and Thursdays only.

  

Mte Lattias

17.8 km, n/a

 

Monte Narcao 

5.6 km, n/a

 

Trails 217 & 203

24.6 km, n/a

7th April 2015

The Sulcis area has been exploited for its mineral wealth since antiquity. This page collects geotagged photos form three sites:

 

- The Rosas mining museum: Lead-zinc was mined here from 1851 to the 1970s. The complex is fascinating to wander through and there are regular guided tours into the mines.

- Ferrovia del Sulcis:  A short walk along the abandoned railway and impressive viaduct that serviced the area's mines. This section of the ‘Ferrovia del Sulcis’ (Sulcis Railway) between Narcao and Siliqua operated between 1926 and 1968, closing when the nearby reservoir (Invaso di Bau Pressiu) was constructed. The tracks have long since been removed, converting the route into an interesting route for hiking and cycling. It crosses many rivers and streams by charming (and well maintained) viaducts, the most impressive of which is the ‘Viadotto Rio Fundus’. More information (in Italian) about the railway can be found here, along with some nice old photos: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrovia_Siliqua-San_Giovanni_Suergiu-Calasetta.

- The Su Montixeddu geo-mineral museum and Su Montixeddu cave: Local museum and cave of the localspeleology club. http://www.speleoclubnuxis.it/grotta-su-montixeddu.html      

  

I hid a geocache at the viaduct

See map below for geotagged photos (mouse-over camera icons), and further down to see the profile and to download the GPX

 

IMGA0914

 

2.2 km, 01:38:53

  

More Sulcis trails:

Maps: North PDF and South PDF  

Online trail maps: http://www.sardegnasentieri.it 

(See also Guida naturalistica PDF and other publications at http://www.sicforestamontearcosu.eu/index.php/pubblicazioni.html- ) 

 

Photo Gallery:

30th August 2016

Alt: 342m. Distance: 5.3 km. Time: 01:53:49

It was a hot summer's day, so this shady short walk was very pleasant. It is also the gateway to a number of longer trails so I was keen to familiarise myself with the area. I drove up to the picnic spot, called Is Figueras (turn right off SP1 heading E, just after the Pantaleo barracks) and did a loop from there. You can also ascent from the picnic area to follow trail number 202 towards Monte Maxia. The loop took my past the remains of some old mining buildings, then the forest barracks that have some interesting display boards, then the remains of the little church of San Pantaleo from where the area gets its name, and finally the remains of small Roman baths. (The Romans had soldiers stationed here to guard the pass through to Cagliary, now the SP1 unpaved road). I also heard a woodpecker hammering away!

 

See map below for geotagged photos (mouse-over camera icons), and further down to see the profile and to download the GPX

 

 

5.3 km, 01:53:49

  

More Sulcis trails:

Maps: North PDF and South PDF  

Online trail maps: http://www.sardegnasentieri.it 

(See also Guida naturalistica PDF and other publications at http://www.sicforestamontearcosu.eu/index.php/pubblicazioni.html- ) 

 

Photo Gallery:

15th Feb 2018

Alt: 1,114m. Distance: 24.3 km. Time: 11:00:51

This was a tough hike! I started at 8:30 and didn't finish until an hour after dark - at 19:30! Fortunately I had brought my headlamp along. It's steep and I had problems with painful knees coming down so it was very slow going. The path (#221) is marked quite well with signposts, but there were a few places I lost my way. I had the track in my Garmin so I swiftly saw when I was off course. The summit of Monte Is Caravius is partially tree covered, so the views are blocked in some directions. There are also similarly high peaks nearby that block some views, however you can see parts of Cagliary (Devil's Saddle) to the East and the sea to the South and West. The route up is the highlight - criss-crossing a stream with waterfalls and pools. The valley is completely cut off from the world so it was just me and the mountain.

Total track time: 11h 00m 51s
Total real distance: 25.3 km
Minimum elevation: 237 m.s.l.
Maximum elevation: 1114 m.s.l.
Total climbing: 2375 m
Total descent: 2328 m

See map below for geotagged photos (mouse-over camera icons), and further down to see the profile and to download the GPX

 

View looking West into the basin on the descent, Punta Su Fixi and Monte Nieddu to the left

IMGA0851a 

My photo looking up to Monte Is Caravius, with a screenshot from Google Earth with my GPS track:

MteIsCaraviusGE2

 

24.3 km, 11:00:51

More Sulcis trails:

Maps: North PDF and South PDF  

Online trail maps: http://www.sardegnasentieri.it 

(See also Guida naturalistica PDF and other publications at http://www.sicforestamontearcosu.eu/index.php/pubblicazioni.html- ) 

 

Photo Gallery:

 

3rd Jan 2012

24th Aug 2016

(Also photos from 30/5/11, 3/4/13 & 5/5/14)

At the foot of Monte Nieddu is a The Sacred Well at Tattinu (9th Century BC) and remains of associated Nuraghic settlement. From here a cart track winds its way up to close to the summit. The gradient of the track is not steep, so this is not a hard climb, but is thus unnecessarily long. I'll find a more direct route up through the woodland tracks one day I expect.

I first walked this path in 2012 having seen it in aerial photography. I just used a print-out to navigate as this was before I had a GPS receiver (or a smartphone). The photos pinned below are therefore not geotagged from GPS (except those from 2016). I pinned them manually, therefore some will be approximately positioned.

There are fine views over to the sea and the island of San Antioco, and accross the valley. Next time I'll go further along the ridge past the summit where there are fewer trees and views to Monte Is Caravius I expect.

 

See map below for geotagged photos (mouse-over camera icons), and further down to see the profile and to download the GPX

 

 

11.3 km, n/a

 MteNieddu profile

More Sulcis trails:

Maps: North PDF and South PDF  

Online trail maps: http://www.sardegnasentieri.it 

(See also Guida naturalistica PDF and other publications at http://www.sicforestamontearcosu.eu/index.php/pubblicazioni.html- ) 

 

Photo Gallery:

 

5th April 2013

23rd Dec 2013

Alt: 842m. Distance: 13 km. Time: 04:21:49

Most of this route follows a cart track that rises from Su Peppi Mereu (a quicker route up would be the trail up from Nuxis, but I wasn't to discover that for another two years). The first time I hiked this route was before I had my Garmin, so I turned back where the track turned into a path through the woods, fearing getting lost. I returned that Christmas time armed with my new Etrex20, a present from my wife, and pushed on through to look for the summit and to see what was on the other side! Mostly wooded, I went the wrong way for the peak (which I would eventually visit five years later), but found a rocky outcrop that was scaleable and from up there got great views across to Monte Nieddu and down the valley to the sea. 

I left a geocache there. 

I pinned the photos manually for April 13, so some have estimated locations.

See map below for geotagged photos (mouse-over camera icons), and further down to see the profile and to download the GPX

 

 Views looking NW from the North face of Monte Tamara:IMGA0297

IMGA0302