Profile for Nuraghi Hunter

 

Geocaching is an outdoor recreational activity, in which participants use a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver or mobile device and other navigational techniques to hide and seek containers, called "geocaches" or "caches", at specific locations marked by coordinates all over the world.

A typical cache is a small waterproof container containing a logbook and sometimes a pen or pencil. The geocacher signs the log with their established code name and dates it, in order to prove that they found the cache. After signing the log, the cache must be placed back exactly where the person found it. Larger containers such as plastic storage containers (Tupperware or similar) can also contain items for trading, such as toys or trinkets, usually of more sentimental worth than financial. Geocaching shares many aspects with benchmarking, trigpointing, orienteering, treasure-hunting, letterboxing and waymarking.

 

It's fun to find or hide a geocache on a hiking route! 

I've made these two versions of Geocache notes in English and Italian. Print two-sided, then cut out:

Geocaching instructions_bilingual.docx

geocachenote_ENG_ITA.doc

 

Converting your TomTom favourites to another format:

For older units eg TomTom One XL, the file is called MapSettings.cfg 

Download POIedit http://poiedit.com/downloads.htm 

Open MapSettings.cfg then do a Btach Convert from Tools Menu. 

Formats: http://www.poiedit.com/compatibility.htm

For geo-referencing photos, I sometimes find my photos' DateTaken is out of sync with the GPS times, usually because I didn't change my camera's clock when travelling to another timezone.

 

This is how to fix it from the command line with EXIFtool (although it's more likely I would use GeoSetter as sometimes a bit of trial and error is required)

 

First install "ExifTool by Phil Harvey" : https://sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool/install.html

 

Stand-Alone Executable

  1. Download the Windows Executable from the ExifTool home page

    (The file you download should be named "exiftool-10.78.zip".)

  2. Extract "exiftool(-k).exe" from the ".zip" file, and place it on your Desktop

    (Double-click on "exiftool-10.78.zip" to open the archive, then drag "exiftool(-k).exe" to your Desktop.)

  1. Rename "exiftool(-k).exe" to "exiftool.exe"

    (or "exiftool(-k)" to "exiftool" if file name extensions are hidden on your system)

  2. Move "exiftool.exe" to the "C:\WINDOWS" directory (or any other directory in your PATH).

You can now run exiftool by typing "exiftool" at the command prompt. (To get to the command prompt, select "Run..." from the Windows "Start" menu, then type "cmd" and press Return.)

 

Date/Time Shift Feature

Have you ever forgotten to set the date/time on your digital camera before taking a bunch of pictures? ExifTool has a time shift feature that makes it easy to apply a batch fix to the timestamps of the images (eg. change the "Date Picture Taken" reported by Windows Explorer). Say for example that your camera clock was reset to 2000:01:01 00:00:00 when you put in a new battery at 2005:11:03 10:48:00. Then all of the pictures you took subsequently have timestamps that are wrong by 5 years, 10 months, 2 days, 10 hours and 48 minutes. To fix this, put all of the images in the same directory ("DIR") and run exiftool:

exiftool "-DateTimeOriginal+=5:10:2 10:48:0" DIR

The example above changes only the DateTimeOriginal tag, but any writable date or time tag can be shifted, and multiple tags may be written with a single command line. Commonly, in JPEG images, the DateTimeOriginal, CreateDate and ModifyDate values must all be changed. For convenience, a Shortcut tag called AllDates has been defined to represent these three tags. So, for example, if you forgot to set your camera clock back 1 hour at the end of daylight savings time in the fall, you can fix the images with:

exiftool -AllDates-=1 DIR

See Image::ExifTool::Shift.pl (download in PDF format) for details about the syntax of the time shift string.

Note: Not all date/time information is covered by the AllDates shortcut. Specifically, the filesystem date/time tags are not included, and this command will reset FileModifyDate to the current date/time as it should when the file is modified, unless either the -P option is used, or FileModifyDate is set to something else. To shift FileModifyDate along with the other tags, add -FileModifyDate-=1 to the command above.

 

 

in the command prompt, I typed:

C:\Users\Pinocchio>exiftool -AllDates-=1 C:\Users\Pinocchio\Pictures\MtArcossu_timefix

 This works for camera set to UK time when GPS track was recorded in Italy

 (To get to the command prompt, select "Run..." from the Windows "Start" menu, then type "cmd" and press Return.)

To add location metadata to a batch of photos, marry them together with a GPS track log. The time the picture was taken is matched with the place on the GPS track at the same time (It is important that your camera's clock was syncronised with your GPS receiver's time)

 

GeoSetter

Freeware, download: http://www.geosetter.de/en/download/

 

Load images, in 'Images' toolbar, select 'Syncronize With GPS Data Files..."

Geosetter user ExifTool, which can be run from the command prompt:

 

ExifTool

Install "ExifTool by Phil Harvey" : https://sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool/install.html

Stand-Alone Executable

  1. Download the Windows Executable from the ExifTool home page

    (The file you download should be named "exiftool-10.78.zip".)

  2. Extract "exiftool(-k).exe" from the ".zip" file, and place it on your Desktop

    (Double-click on "exiftool-10.78.zip" to open the archive, then drag "exiftool(-k).exe" to your Desktop.)

  1. Rename "exiftool(-k).exe" to "exiftool.exe"

    (or "exiftool(-k)" to "exiftool" if file name extensions are hidden on your system)

  2. Move "exiftool.exe" to the "C:\WINDOWS" directory (or any other directory in your PATH).

You can now run exiftool by typing "exiftool" at the command prompt. (To get to the command prompt, select "Run..." from the Windows "Start" menu, then type "cmd" and press Return.)

  

 The Geotag tag is used to define the GPS track log data. The geotagging feature is activated by assigning the name of a track log file to this tag. As an example, the following command line adds GPS tags to all images in the "/Users/Phil/Pictures" directory based on GPS positions stored in the track log file "track.log" in the current directory:

exiftool -geotag=track.log /Users/Phil/Pictures

 

Geotag all images in the "c:\images" directory from position information in a GPS track log ("c:\gps logs\track.log"). Since the Geotime time is not specified, the value of DateTimeOriginal# is used. Local system time is assumed unless DateTimeOriginal# contains a timezone:

exiftool -geotag "c:\gps logs\track.log" c:\images

 

In the command prompt, enter the following:

exiftool -geotag "C:\Users\Pinocchio\Documents\Tim\Website\Hampi\history-2017-11-16.kml" C:\Users\Pinocchio\Documents\Tim\Website\Hampi\ToGeotag

 

Basecamp lets you geotag phots and make records of your treks: http://www.garmin.com/en-GB/shop/downloads/basecamp

 

To add location metadata to a batch of photos you need to marry them together with a GPS track log. The time the picture was taken is matched with the place on the GPS track at the same time (It is important that your camera's clock was syncronised with your GPS receiver's time)

 

Import your GPS track into Basecamp

Right click on the track, then select 'Geotag photos using this track'

  1. Images/Open folder
  2. 'Shift Select' all the photos requiring geotagging
  3. Images/Synchronise with GPS Data File
  4. Select data file (This is the GPX track recorded on the hike)
  5. Use 'Local Window Settings'
  6. If the locations don't match up, then use
  7. 'Use track point from Map'
  8. Picking a known location and corresponding photo will give an idea of time correction required
  9. Update photos

If you have geotagged photos and want to generate a GPS track from them, try this:

I thought I would be able to do this easily with Geosetter, as it's described in the documentation. But the functionality doesn't seem to be there any more. I therefore went back to EXIFtool (That Geosetter is based on)

EXIFtool is operated from the command line, so a bit of a challenge to get working:

 

 

First it has to be installed (see other article)

 

Then you need to get the gpx.fmt file for this function to work, and copy it to the directory where your photos are... The gpx.fmt doesn't come with the executable version of the download, so I had to download the tar.gz version of the EXIFtool download and extract the file with 7Zip !

 

Then it's to the command line (type cmd into the Windows Start bar):

 

You need to be in the same directory were your photos are:

cd \Users\Pinocchio\Documents\Tim\Website\Hampi\ToGeotag

 

Then enter the following EXIFtool command:

exiftool -r -if "$gpsdatetime" -fileOrder gpsdatetime -p gpx.fmt \Users\Pinocchio\Documents\Tim\Website\Hampi\ToGeotag > \Users\Pinocchio\Documents\Tim\Website\Hampi\ToGeotag\Hampi.gpx

 

The output file, Hampi.gpx, is the track joining up each photo!

-

Tip: If your photos came from different cameras, rename the photos so that they are numbed concurrently (use IrfanView), then use the following command:

exiftool -p gpx.fmt \Users\Pinocchio\Documents\Tim\Website\Hampi\ToGeotag\Small > \Users\Pinocchio\Documents\Tim\Website\Hampi\ToGeotag\Small\Hampi3.gpx

Making something like this:  http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/examples/google_fields.html

 

Resize photos to 18% (Image resize software that keeps metadata intact: http://www.irfanview.com/64bit.htm) - Freeware!

Use this tool to extract the photos' EXIF metadata: http://www.br-software.com/extracter.html - Freeware!

  

Output:

!"Filename" Date and time GPS latitude GPS longitude

 

Use it to fill this:

name desc shortdesc label label_offset folder url thumbnail thumbnail_width photo photo_size icon color scale opacity

 

Add to GPS Visualizer's Google form, with GPX

......

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