1/4 Battalion London Regiment (City of London) War Diary,

Download from here: War Diary

 

(War Diaries are downloadable from The National Archives: http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C7354938#imageViewerLink)

The National Archive research guide: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-with-your-research/research-guides/first-world-war/

 

 WarDiary August17Cover

 

The Operational Orders:

The orders below refer to the Hooge map, downloadable from here: Hooge Map (Large File 43MB), detail below:

HoogeMapb clip

I have annotated the map:

BattlePlan2 

Above: Reggie's battalion, the 4th Londons, were to attack with the 7th Bedfords on their right and the 169th Brigade on their left. The intention was to advance in a practically due east direction, while at stated points in the line of advance platoons would halt one by one, each establishing itself in a strong point, until finally, when the last platoon reached its halting point, the whole Battalion would be deployed in a line of outposts, all of which would turn to their right and face south. The attack was to be delivered along the whole battle front at 5.45 a.m. (Zero Hour) under cover of a creeping barrage, supported by machine-gun barrage and heavy gun fire on the enemy back areas. At zero hour the British barrage came down, well distributed and of terrific intensity. It was hoped that the danger points in Inverness Copse would be put out of action by our artillery, so that the task of the 7th Bedfords would be an easy one, but calculations in this respect were soon found to have been mistaken.

1 4thLondon RegtOperation Orders15 8 17 part1

 1 4thLondon RegtOperation Orders15 8 17 part2

 

The Report On Operations:

Things did not go to plan. The leading companies of the l/4th Londons got away from the mark at zero, in good order and well up to the barrage, but almost immediately came under a hail of lead from Inverness Copse. The attack of the 7th Bedfords, of such vital importance to the success of the whole operation, had failed. The artillery fire had not produced the expected effect on the enormously strong enemy posts over which the barrage had passed harmlessly, and the 7th Bedfords were repulsed with loss, thereby leaving the l/4th Londons completely exposed to the full force of the enemy's nest of machine-guns on their right flank.

The 7th Bedford's War Diary reports that the barrage fell short onto a company about to move forward to the attack, knocking 50% of them out (a company numbered 227 heads when at full establishment, however It was not unknown at times for battalions with a nominal strength of over a 1000 men to go into fighting with perhaps only 200. http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/definitions-of-units/what-was-a-battalion-of-infantry/

 

I have plotted the co-ordinates mentioned in the report below onto a Google Earth map, download from here [link] (You'll need to have Google Earth installed on your computer or phone.

This is the Google Maps version, lacking image overlays that allowed me to plot the points. Click on the icons for more info. (How To Read A Trench Map: http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/battlefields/how-to-read-a-british-trench-map/)

 

InvernessCopse

Above: Aerial photograph showing road leading to Menin and Ypres with 'Inverness Copse' clearly marked. Sheet 28, J14. Date 19 August 1917. http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307859 

 

AerialPhoto2

Above: September 16, 1917. The Ypres to Menin road can clearly be seen cutting a diagonal across the lower-left corner of the photo. Inverness Copse in the lower-right. Jap Avenue runs accross the centre.

Click image above to open very highly detailed aerial photo on McMaster University website. Then click on the icon indicated above for full screen mode. Mouse roll to Zoom

 

15 16August17Diary

16 August17Diary

 

Below, the casualties. Sgt Reginald Chapman will be one of the 39 Other Ranks (O.R.) killed on 16 August. One of his comrades would later visit his parents and inform them he was shot in the head.

Casualties3 18 August1917

 

 

The war history of the 4th Battalion, the London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers), 1914-1919, Published 1922
by Grimwade, F. Clive

The book retells the account from the War Diary, with some extra detail.

Whole book available as PDF at https://archive.org/details/warhistoryof4thb00grim

Chapter of interest PDF: Extract

 

Page 297

.....

The l/4th Londons were detailed for this attack on the morning of the 14th August, and it is important in view of what subsequently occurred to bear this date in mind. It must also be remembered that at this time the Battalion was some seven miles from the field of battle and that no officer, N.C.O. or man belonging to it had ever set eyes on the ground over which the battle was to be fought. During the morning Lieut.-Col. Campbell, the Adjutant and the four company officers went forward to reconnoitre the forward area, visiting in turn 169th Brigade Headquarters at Dormy House, and Headquarters of the Battalion in line of the 53rd Brigade at Stirling Castle.


It had been intended also to reconnoitre the ground over which the advance was to be made, but such was the intensity of the enemy's artillery and machine-gun fire that this was impossible, and the company commanders were compelled to return to their companies in ignorance of what lay before them. Later in the day Lieut.-Col. Campbell was ordered to report to 53rd Brigade Headquarters, but was unluckily hit on his way back, near Zillebeeke Lake. Although badly hit he made his way back to the Battalion, but being unable to carry on was succeeded in the command by Major A. F. Marchment, M.C. (1/lst Londons).


At seven that night the Battalion moved forward from Dickebusch to Chateau Segard, the move being completed by 11 p.m. Shortly after dawn on the 15th the forward move was continued to Railway Dugouts, in the cutting between Shrapnel Corner and Zillebeeke Lake, and here the Battalion remained during the day. The 15th August was occupied in issuing battle equipment and rations to the companies, while Lieut.-Col. Marchment took the opportunity of conducting a  reconnaissance of the forward area and communications, and of issuing his operation orders. These were explained to company commanders as adequately as time permitted, but it must be borne in mind that when the Battalion moved forward to the assault the following morning no company or platoon officer had been able to see the ground over which he was to lead his men.

At 6.30 p.m. the l/4th Londons left Railway Dugouts in battle order for the assembly area at Clapham Junction with guides supplied from the 53rd Brigade. A great deal of heavy shelling, in which four men of B Company were hit, was experienced during the advance, and in breasting a ridge near Sanctuary Wood the Battalion had to pass through a barrage put down by the Germans. Aided by the excellent discipline of the troops, however, company commanders were able to split up their companies within a few seconds, and no loss was sustained. By ten o'clock the Battalion was concentrated with A, B and C Companies in the tunnel under the Menin Road, and D Company in the trench south of the road. Battlion Headquarters and part of C Company were in the trench on the north side of the tunnel.

There was no defined line of trenches in this area, the front being held by isolated shell hole posts, and the assembly was to be made on tape lines laid down under staff arrangements. The lack of shelter thus made it necessary to keep the Battalion under such cover as was obtainable till the last possible moment. During the evening an officer of each company reconnoitred the route from the concentration area to the tape lines, assistance being rendered by the 6th Royal Berkshires, and No Man's Land in front of the line of assembly was patrolled until shortly before zero hour.

The intention was to advance in a practically due east direction, while at stated points in the line of advance platoons would halt one by one, each establishing itself in a strong point, until finally, when the last platoon reached its halting point, the whole Battalion would be deployed in a line of outposts, all of which would turn to their right and face south.

This advance, being made on a front of two companies, would result in a double line of posts of which the left flank would rest on Black Watch Corner in touch with the 169th Brigade, while the right flank would join hands with the 7th Bedfords in the corner of Inverness Copse.

At 3.15 a.m. on the 16th August companies began to form up on the tape lines, the assembly being completed by 4.20 a.m., when the troops were lying down in the open under a continuous and fairly heavy shell fire and a galling machine-gun fire from the direction of Inverness CopseAbout 22 casualties occurred under this fire before zero hour at 5.45 a.m. The order of battle was as follows : A. Company (Spiers) on the right and B Company (Stanbridge) on the left in front ; with D Company (H. N.Williams) on the right and C Company (Rees) on the left in support.

The attack was to be delivered along the whole battle front at 5.45 a.m. under cover of a creeping barrage, supported by machine-gun barrage and heavy gun fire on the enemy back areas. At zero hour the British barrage came down, well distributed and of terrific intensity. It was hoped that the danger points in Inverness Copse would be put out of action by our artillery, so that the task of the 7th Bedfords would be an easy one, but calculations in this respect were soon found to have been mistaken. 

The leading companies of the l/4th Londons got away from the mark at zero, in good order and well up to the barrage, but almost immediately came under a hail of lead from Inverness Copse. The attack of the 7th Bedfords, of such vital importance to the success of the whole operation, had failed. The artillery fire had not produced the expected effect on the enormously strong enemy posts over which the barrage had passed harmlessly, and the 7th Bedfords were repulsed with loss, thereby leaving the l/4th Londons completely exposed to the full force of the enemy's nest of machine-guns on their right flank.

 

  • Extract from 7th Battalion, the Bedfordshire Regiment. War Diary,  16-8-17:  B Company having formed up on the tapes put out by 2nd Lt.Craig during the night attacked the enemy strong point at J14 c.4.4. (APP I) This attack was carried out in conjunction with a large offensive by the Division on our left; a heavy shrapnel barrage opened at ZERO hour (4.45 AM) and 4.5 howitzers shot on strong points. Owing to some mistake a battery of 4.5 howitzers detailed to shoot on the enemy's strong point at J 14 c.4.4 fired short and on to our B Company about to move forward to the attack, knocking 50% of their effectives out. Cap Ferguson at once supported with a platoon of D Company but owing to the heavy enemy M/G fire little could be done and the attempt to capture the strong point was abandoned. 7 AM The day was chiefly spent in artillery duals no further infantry activity taking place on our sector.  (http://bedfordregiment.org.uk/7thbn/7thbtn1917diary.html)

 

Within a few minutes 5 officers and 40 N.C.O.'s and men of A and B Companies were casualties, but the survivors pushed forward steadily, though a certain amount of delay caused by the gaps so suddenly torn in their ranks was inevitable. The gallantry displayed by all ranks under this devastating machine-gun fire, to which was added enemy shell fire of great intensity, was unsurpassed, but under such a storm of bullets at close range nothing could live, and the Battalion was brought to a standstill about 200 yards from startingpoint, in an old German trench which skirted a ruined farmhouse about midway between Inverness Copse and Glencorse Wood.

A party of some 60 men of all companies managed to gain shelter in Jap Avenue. Here they were organised by 2/Lieut. H. E. Jackman, under whom a strong post was consolidated and an attempt made to push forward along the trench. This proved unsuccessful owing to the continued intensity of the enemy machine-gun fire and the accuracy of his sniping. Further attempts by other companies to advance were also fruitless, and the Battalion was forced to content itself with hanging on to these small gains, from which at intervals it was able to engage with Lewis gun and rifle fire small bodies of the enemy in the open near the east end of Glencorse Wood.


An attempt was made to re-establish the situation by an attack, for which the 53rd Brigade was called upon, through Inverness Copse from south to north, but so terribly reduced in numbers were its battalions that Brigade reserve was limited to two weak platoons and further action was found to be for the moment impossible.

...

https://archive.org/details/warhistoryof4thb00grim

 

 

See also:

The Great War: The British Campaign in France and Flanders, Vol. IV
by
Arthur Conan Doyle

first published by Hodder & Stoughton, London, 1919

CHAPTER VII. THE THIRD BATTLE OF YPRES August 1 to September 6


...The advance of the Fifty-sixth Division upon the right could not be said to be more successful. The 167th Brigade were on the left, the 169th in the centre with the desperate task of carrying Nonneboschen and Glencorse, while the hard-worked 53rd Brigade of the Eighteenth Division was detailed to form a defensive flank upon the south. It was really the failure of this attack which contributed greatly to the failure of the whole, for there was a strong point at the north-west corner of Inverness Copse with strong machine-gun emplacements which could sweep the area to the north over a wide arc. Thus all the troops north of this point were faced from the start by a devastating fire. The 167th Brigade got well forward to Nonneboschen, but was stopped by bogs and so fell behind the barrage. On the left they reached Albert Redoubt, but were driven in by a strong counter-attack. The 169th reached the east end of Glencorse Wood where they killed many Germans and captured sixty gunners, but the counter-attacks gradually drove the line back to whence it started. A German officer captured a few days later has described how he saw the London men, mostly without officers, walking slowly back in front of his advance. It was a day of hard slogging upon this sector with very little to show for it. So serious were the losses of the Fifty-sixth Division that the Fourteenth Division took its place next day, while the other London Territorial unit, the Forty-seventh Division (Gorringe) took over the line of the hard-worked Eighth.

Thus we have passed down the whole line upon August 16, and have noted the victory of the north, the stalemate of the centre, and the failure on the south. There can be no doubt that the losses of the British were very much in excess of those of the Germans, for the line of the latter could be held cheaply owing to the Mebus system which presented a new and formidable problem for the British generals. On the other hand the actual trophies of victory lay with the attack, since in the north they had possessed themselves of the German third line, and had captured 30 guns with more than 2000 prisoners.

...

http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks12/1202581h.html#chap7

 

See also:


At 4:45 a.m., the British creeping barrage began and the infantry advanced. German flares were seen rising but the German artillery response was slow and missed the attackers. In the 18th Division area, German machine-gun fire from pillboxes caused many losses to the 53rd Brigade (inc. Reggie's battalion) , which was stopped in front of the north-west corner of Inverness Copse. Part of the brigade managed to work forward further north and formed a defensive flank along the southern edge of Glencorse Wood. To the north, the 169th Brigade of the 56th Division advanced quickly at the start but veered to the right around boggy ground, then entered Glencorse Wood. The German main line of resistance was in a sunken road inside the wood, where after a hard-fought and mutually costly engagement, the German defenders were overrun and the rest of the wood occupied. The leading waves then advanced to Polygon Wood.

The 167th Brigade also had a fast start but when it reached the north end of Nonne Bosschen, found mud 4 ft (1.2 m) deep, the brigade veering round it to the left but the gap which this caused between the 167th and 169th brigades was not closed. Another problem emerged, because the quick start had been partly due to the rear waves pushing up to avoid German shelling on the left of the brigade. The follow-up infantry mingled with the foremost troops and failed to mop up the captured ground or German troops who had been overrun, who began sniping from behind at both brigades. Part of a company reached the area north of Polygon Wood, at about the same time as small numbers of troops from the 8th Division.The ground conditions in the 56th Division area, were so bad that none of the tanks in support got into action.

The troops of 169th Brigade of the 56th Division, which tried to follow the leading waves from Glencorse Wood, were stopped at the edge of Polygon Wood and then pushed back by a counter-attack by the German 34th Division around 7:00 a.m., the troops ahead of them being overwhelmed. The brigade was driven back later in the afternoon to its start line, by German attacks from the south and east by troops from a regiment of the 54th Division sent back into the line. The 167th Brigade pulled back its right flank as the 169th Brigade was seen withdrawing through Glencorse Wood and at 3:00 p.m. the Germans attacked the front of 167th Brigade and the 25th Brigade of the 8th Division to the north. The area was under British artillery observation and the German attack was stopped by massed artillery fire. At 5.00 p.m. the brigade withdrew to a better position 380 yd (350 m) in front of its start line, to gain touch with 25th Brigade. German artillery fired continuously on a line from Stirling Castle to Westhoek and increased the rate of bombardment from noon, which isolated the attacking British battalions from reinforcements and supplies and prepared the counter-attack made in the afternoon.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Langemarck_(1917) 

Reference:

Dudley Ward, C. H. (2001) [1921]. The Fifty Sixth Division 1914–1918 (1st London Territorial Division) (Naval and Military Press ed.). London: Murray. ISBN 978-1-84342-111-5.

 

See also:

A personal account of the battle, from an officer of the 2nd  Berkshires (who were fighting a mile North of the 4th Londons) is documented here: http://www.purley.eu/RBR3272.pdf  See page 7. 

 


Reggie has no known grave. It is likely his body was obliterated by exploding ordnance, lost in the mud. But the number of deaths on the 16th August from his battalion would suggest he would perhaps have been buried in a temporary cemetery. The nearby cemeteries' descriptions (on CWGC) describe bodies having been moved to them from the surrounding area.

Who else died with Reggies, on 16th August, and where were they buried? Maybe he is an 'unknown soldier' buried in a nearby cemetery.

from CWGC database:

 

The named officers:

surname forename initials age_text date_of_death rank regiment unitshipsquadron Country cemeterymemorial gravereference additionalinformation
DAVIS ARTHUR GEORGE A G 23 16/08/1917 Second Lieutenant London Regiment (Finsbury Rifles) "D" Coy. Belgium YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 54. Son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Davis, of Holway Hill, Taunton, Somerset. B. Sc.
ELLIOTT JOHN BENJAMIN GEORGE J B G   16/08/1917 Second Lieutenant London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers) 4th Bn. Belgium YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
SPEYER CECIL ARTHUR C A 22 16/08/1917 Second Lieutenant London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers) "C" Coy. 4th Bn. Belgium YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Arthur A. and Julia M. Speyer, of The Red Cottage, Magpie Hall Lane, Bickley, Kent. Went to France with the 1st Bn. Hon. Artillery Company, Sept., 1914.

 

All memorialised on the Minin Gate, no know graves. 

None of the 39 other ranks from the battalion have known graves either:

surname forename initials age_text date_of_death rank unitshipsquadron Country servicenumberexport cemeterymemorial gravereference additionalinformation
ABRAHAMS SOLOMON S 20 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '281753' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Phillip and Phoebe Abrahams, of 12, Exchange Buildings, Cutler St., Houndsditch, London.
ANELLI FREDERICK WILLIAM F W   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '282898' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
BAKER GEORGE G   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '282205' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
BAYLEY WILLIAM HENRY W H 20 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '295190' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Mr. J. J. and Mrs. L. Bayley, of 130, Fleet Rd., Hampstead, London.
BEAL JOHN THOMAS J T 40 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '295222' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Beal, of 3, Invicta Rd., Sheerness, Kent; husband of Flora Beal, of 20, Brigstock Rd., Belvedere, Kent.
BLENKO EDWARD HENRY E H 20 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '281935' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Blenko, of 13, Morpeth Grove, Morpeth Rd., South Hackney, London.
BRIMMER ALFRED A 21 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283810' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Francis Henry and Louie Margaret Brimmer, of 2, M Block, Peabody Buildings, Stamford St., Blackfriars Rd., London.
BROOKS LEONARD ARTHUR L A 25 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '282045' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Brooks; husband of Sarah E. Brooks, of 9, Glyn Rd., Homerton, London.
BROWN TYSON ARTHUR T A 40 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '282986' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Mrs. Catherine Brown, of 22, Drysdale St., Kingsland Rd., London.
CHAPMAN REGINALD J. R J   16/08/1917 Serjeant 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '295115' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
CONWAY ALFRED EDWARD A E 23 16/08/1917 Lance Serjeant 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '280746' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Henry Conway, of 115, West Green Rd., South Tottenham, London.
CUMPPER CHARLES WILLIAM C W 20 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '281962' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Charles J. and Lizzie Cumpper, of 24, Leopold St., Vauxhall, London.
EDWARDS FREDERICK WILLIAM F W 20 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '280229' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Joseph Henry and Frances Louisa Edwards, of 57, Graham St., City Rd., London.
EVANS WALTER W   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '280548' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
FABLING WILLIAM W 30 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283210' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Alfred Fabling, of 7, Radnor Terrace, King's Highway, Plumstead, London, and the late Caroline Fabling; husband of Jane Fabling, of 22, Wickham Lane, Plumstead, London.
FRY LEONARD THOMAS L T   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283149' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
GOUGH CHARLES JAMES C J 35 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283247' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  Son of George and Mary Ann Gough, of 66, Elesmere Rd., Roman Rd., Bow, London; husband of Eleanor Grace Annie Gough, of 13, Cantrell Rd., Bow Common Lane, Bow, London.
GROWER ABRAHAM A 19 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '295215' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Levy and Bessie Grower, of 10, Nottingham Place, Commercial Rd., Stepney, London.
HAMMOND JOHN J   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '295228' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
HARLEY ALEXANDER A   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283203' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
HOPCROFT JOHN J   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283922' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
JACKSON SIDNEY ALBERT ED S A E   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '295106' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
JONES ALBERT A   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '280686' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
KING WILLIAM ALBERT W A 20 16/08/1917 Serjeant 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '280308' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of William J. and Susan King, of 39, Appleby St., Haggerston, London.
LEE ERIC CHARLES E C 20 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283766' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Eli and Selina Lee, of 75, Grand Parade, Harringay, London.
MACDONALD WILLIAM EDWARD W E   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '281888' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 54.  
MATCHAM EDWIN E   16/08/1917 Corporal 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283581' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
MOSS JAMES ROBERT J R 26 16/08/1917 Serjeant 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '281825' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of George and Hannah Moss, of 45, Vivian Rd., Roman Rd., Bow, London.
McGUINNESS HUGH DUNN H D 30 16/08/1917 Lance Corporal 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '281421' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Dora McGuinness, of 73, Forsyth Rd., Jesmond, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and the late James McGuinness.
NORTON HAROLD H   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '282904' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
NYE JAMES HERBERT J H   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '295104' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
OGLES CHARLES C 20 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283065' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Ogles, of 16, Clever Rd., Custom House, London.
OGLES LOCHLAN HENRY L H   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '295205' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of George Edward Ogles, of 27, Percy Rd., Canning Town, London.
PAYN ALBERT ARTHUR A A 20 16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283918' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Sarah Esther Payn, of 85, Glasgow Rd., Plaistow, London.
POWELL WILLIAM THOMAS W T 20 16/08/1917 Lance Corporal 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '281958' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52. Son of Samuel and Amelia Powell, of 234, Howard Rd., Barking, Essex.
ROSS HERBERT H   16/08/1917 Lance Corporal 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '280497' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
SEYMOUR WILLIAM W   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283930' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
SHAW WILLIAM W   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '283739' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
SIMPSON CHARLES C   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '281298' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
THOMAS WILLIAM JOHN W J   16/08/1917 Private 1st/4th Belgium '282768' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  
TOOKER JOHN PATRICK MARTIN J P M 20 16/08/1917 Lance Corporal 1st/4th Bn. Belgium '282064' YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL Panel 52.  Son of Sarah Mary Tooker, of 44, Vicarage Rd., West Hill, Hastings, and the late James Tooker.

 

None of the soldiers who died with Reggie have known graves. They likely remain where they fell, in this field in Flanders:  

 

 

4119 soldiers/sailors died in the war that day

261 from the London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers)

 


 

 


For the Fallen

BY LAURENCE BINYON
 
With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children, 
England mourns for her dead across the sea. 
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit, 
Fallen in the cause of the free.
Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal 
Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres, 
There is music in the midst of desolation 
And a glory that shines upon our tears.
They went with songs to the battle, they were young, 
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. 
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; 
They fell with their faces to the foe.
They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: 
Age shall not weary them, nor the years contemn. 
At the going down of the sun and in the morning 
We will remember them.
They mingle not with their laughing comrades again; 
They sit no more at familiar tables of home; 
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time; 
They sleep beyond England's foam.
But where our desires are and our hopes profound, 
Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight, 
To the innermost heart of their own land they are known 
As the stars are known to the Night;
As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust, 
Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain; 
As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness, 
To the end, to the end, they remain.

 

 Reggie bike small2

Above: Reggie at army camp (Click image for high-res version)

 

  

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